A character analysis pearl in nathaniel hawthornes the scarlet letter

She does not let the scarlet A define her life, but resumes wearing it and helping people until the end.

Hawthorne's 'The Scarlet Letter': Symbolism and Character Analysis

A strange, sad man is he, with his hand always over his heart! A rather difficult child, she likes to be free and even refuses to listen to her mother at times.

It represents shame and penance. The brilliant man that he is, he soon figures out that Dimmesdale is the culprit. Even Hester says, "Art thou like the Black Man that haunts the forest round about us?

She even takes it off when she asks Dimmesdale to run off with her to Europe. When he denies her once again, she washes away his kiss, apt punishment for a man who will not take responsibility.

In the beginning, it is used as a symbol of adultery and sin, when Hester is forced to wear it and stand on the scaffold for the whole town to see. In the end, when Dimmesdale confesses that she is his daughter too, she is content, and becomes a quiet and calm child.

Unable to bear the anguish and inner torment, he finally confesses in front of the entire town, revealing the A seared into his chest.

In any number of places, she reminds Hester that she must wear, and continue to wear, the scarlet letter. Much to the consternation of her Puritan society, Hester dresses Pearl in outfits of gold or red or both.

She even makes one for herself out of eel grass and puts it on her dress, like her mother does. As she looks in the brook in Chapter 19, she sees "another child, — another and the same, with likewise its ray of golden light. The difference is that Pearl hates her toys.

Discussed below in brief are some of the symbols used in The Scarlet Letter, their meanings, and before that, a detailed analysis of the characters. However, later on, its meaning changes for Hester. Hester names her daughter "Pearl," as in pure, white, and definitely not sinful.

The scarlet color may also be a reflection of his rage towards her and the other man, and his vow for vengeance. Colors Scarlet is the most prominent color in the story, starting right from the main character - the A.

The Scarlet Letter

Notice that three and seven are "magic" numbers. Hence, to the town, it is a mark of shame, guilt, and punishment.

This probably symbolizes that it has taken over her life, and governs every day of her existence. A close examination of Chapter 6, "Pearl," shows the unification of the child with the idea of sin. This is a passion that does not know the bounds of the Puritan village.

He is a physician, who comes to Boston to find that his wife is being tried for adultery. The moment that Dimmesdale acknowledges her as his child—his "little Pearl" The sun always shines on Pearl though, as she is an innocent and pure child, albeit born from sin.

Although everyone holds him in high regard, he is living a secret till the end. The Scarlet Letter is a very intelligent and insightful story that does require some thought. The pine-trees, aged, black, and solemn, and flinging groans and other melancholy utterances on the breeze, needed little transformation to figure as Puritan elders; the ugliest weeds of the garden were their children, whom Pearl smote down and uprooted most unmercifully … In the mere exercise of the fancy, however, and the sportiveness of a growing mind, there might be a little more than was observable in other children of bright faculties; except as Pearl, in the dearth of human playmates, was thrown more upon the visionary throng which she created.

Okay, she does have the advantage of knowing that he and her mom have secret meetings in the woods, but, come on, the girl is only seven years old when this happens. Once again on the scaffold in Chapter 13, Pearl asks the minister to stand with them in the light of day and the eyes of the community.

She tells her mother that "the sunshine does not love you. Other dark colors like black and gray symbolize dullness, gloom, and the Puritan way of living. Their conversation reminds us that, as a symbol, Pearl is also the conscience of a number of people.

Note that the narrator calls this "witchcraft": Her love for Dimmesdale makes her take the entire blame for her sin and never reveal his name. Thus, it symbolizes many different things at a time. He begins to torture the minister mentally to find out the truth.

Even as a baby, she instinctively reaches for the scarlet letter.To Hester, it means the pearl of great price, the pearl in Jesus' parable that is bought at "great price." If you're thinking by now that Pearl is much more of a symbol than an actual character—well, you're right.

A Character Analysis of Pearl in Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter Word Count Includes Outline at the End of the Paper The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne is a book of much symbolism. Pearl also functions as a constant reminder of Hester's adulterous act.

She is, in fact, the personification of that act. Even as a baby, she instinctively reaches for the scarlet letter.

Hawthorne says it is the first object of which she seemed aware, and she focuses on the letter in many scenes. Hawthorne's 'The Scarlet Letter': Symbolism and Character Analysis A bestselling story and a popular read even today, The Scarlet Letter is a marvelous story that comes from the mind of Nathaniel Hawthorne, a brilliant and legendary writer.

A Character Analysis of Pearl in Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter Word Count Includes Outline at the End of the Paper The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne is a book of much symbolism. One of the most complex and misunderstood symbols in the book is Pearl, the illegitimate daughter of Hester Prynne and Reverend Arthur.

A Character Analysis of Pearl in Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter Words | 6 Pages. A Character Analysis of Pearl in Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter Word Count Includes Outline at the End of the Paper The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne is a book of much symbolism.

Download
A character analysis pearl in nathaniel hawthornes the scarlet letter
Rated 0/5 based on 73 review